The Top Five Ioniq Questions That Weren’t Answered on “Hyundai LIVE!” 

On December 8, Hyundai Sales Training presented “Hyundai LIVE! The Power of Choice,” a live webcast introducing the all-new Ioniq and the entire 2017 line of eco-friendly Hyundai Blue Drive vehicles. 

As with every “Hyundai LIVE!” webcast, subject matter experts answered viewer questions at the end of the show. And—as with every “Hyundai LIVE!” webcast—there wasn’t enough time to answer all of them.

Below you’ll find the answers to five of the most frequently asked questions whose answers didn’t make it to air. (You can see an archive video of the questions that were answered here on www.HyundaiSalesTraining.com. From the home page, scroll through the headlines until you see “The Power of Choice,” then select “Click Here for Recorded Webcast.)

Is the Ioniq considered a midsize or compact size car?

With 122.7 cubic feet of combined passenger and cargo volume, the Ioniq Hybrid is classified by the EPA as a large car—as are the Ioniq Electric and the upcoming Ioniq Plug-in Hybrid, which each have 120.0 cubic feet of combined passenger and cargo room. By comparison, the Toyota Prius (with nickel metal hydride battery), Ford C-Max Energi, Chevy Volt and Nissan Leaf are all considered midsize cars.

Is the lifetime battery warranty for the original owner only?

Yes.

How many exterior color choices for the Ioniq?

The Ioniq Electric will be offered in Ceramic White, Black Noir Pearl, Symphony Air Silver, and Electric Blue Metallic. The Ioniq Hybrid will be available in all of these colors plus Summit Gray Pearl.

What demographic are we targeting with the Ioniq?

When tested among focus groups, compared to other hybrids, Ioniq accepters were more equally balanced among men and women, were more likely to be single (though nearly 

When tested among focus groups, compared to other hybrids, Ioniq accepters were more equally balanced among men and women, were more likely to be single (though nearly half were families with children), and had a higher mean household income. You can see the results in the chart below:

Chart 

 

With the new Trump Administration, is the price of electricity expected to come down?

Actually, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Short Term Energy Outlook (http://www.eia.gov/outlooks/steo/report/electricity.cfm), after falling from 2015 to 2016, the cost of residential-sector electricity is expected to increase about 2.6 percent in 2017, from 12.53 cents to 12.87 cents per kilowatt hour.